A recent letter to the editor by Doris Stell regarding the Apache County policy regarding zoning for manufactured homes is not totally accurate. Manufactured homes older than 15 years old can be moved either into or out of Apache County. Owners can also trade in older homes for newer homes. This has had no impact on property values.

Doris also commented on homes falling apart if moved. Historically this has not been the case. Homes built in the 1960's have been moved up to 6 times with little or no problems. More modern manufactured homes built after 1976 have been designed and engineered to withstand multiple moves.

We do agree with Doris on the restrictive zoning by Apache County officials. A county in need of quality, affordable housing should look at other Arizona counties for a more workable solution. An Executive Order was issued by the White House on June 25, 2019, addressing the nations needs for affordable housing and a need to have government barriers removed.

Ken Anderson, President

Manufactured Housing Industry of Arizona

(4) comments

Russ_in_WML

manufactured homes are garbage and do not follow the stringent code requirements of site built homes.

TN4994

Just remember that the Housing Developers use the cheapest labor and materials available. Things that were designed for temporary structures, such as Sheetrock and Masonite siding are now considered cost effective for permanent homes. Even today's stucco is suspect to breeding black mold.

che guevara

Workmanship is a thing of the past , and the quality of construction materials have been declining over the past three to four decades . It is almost impossible to get a truly quality - built home that will last longer than the lien against it any longer , unless you have very deep pockets and are fortunate enough to find an old school builder . Larger house sizes and superficiality of gadgets with a few low - cost gingerbread adornments have been sold to a largely ignorant public , along with debt servitude financing which most will never even pay - off anyhow ( the average American tends to move about every eight years - while the amortization schedule on a 30 year direct - reduction Death - Pledge aka Mort - Gage , primarily pays interest for the first 15 years into the banker's scheme ) . Moreover, even manufactured homes now rely upon debt servitude for purchase in most cases , whereas these were originally designed as a final sunbelt retirement abode to have been purchased in cash and to last for the remaining years of one's dotage . As emerging nations such as China and India compete for timber , steel and other raw materials , the quality of housing will most assuredly continue to decline --- as the prices continue to rise . I actually believe that the next housing trend will not only necessitate down - sizing from the McMansion era , but will bring into prominence the realm of shipping container homes both for reasons of affordability and sturdiness of construction , as wood is the worst - Worst - Worst possible material to build a house out of anyway . I know of one particular company in Albuquerque who is on the cutting edge of this trend , and I have attempted to have them enter into a joint venture with the Navajo Nation Housing Authority . To date , these attempts have been unsuccessful and have only managed to pique the interest of those with decision making capacities . TN : good spot - on comments . Russ : as usual , it is evident that a great deal of thought and effort was invested into your comment .

RetAF

have you seen a manufactured home? Would you like to live next to one?

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.